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, they said, take care of yourself to get reelected. >> the opposite of a democrat in the united states, the difference is a conservative, not a republican. you cannot be -- a republican if you are not against big spending. >> keep thinking that. >> here is what i would say. what i would say is, look at virginia. bob macdonald reached over, not by moderating his principles, but by saying that his principles were not only good for saying, no. he says he wants to grow the economy, but he just wants us to do it, not washington. there is a positive, republican agenda out there. we will see more of that in 2010. >> when i first opted to propose the question, this was slightly more off-base. i want to bring up the idea. i came down here from boston, where republican was a dirty word. not because of the belief system but the reputation. my question is how much opinion is placed in the word, republican or democrat. and how much is in the ideology. how much will this affect things over the last year? how much has that changed? >> it is an interesting attachment to the word republican, as there i
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
be said you would save for a man who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army, and that was how congress does it made him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nations forces, he dowson its forces, patrolled its frontiers and for most of that time, he also said america's military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere. and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings of agent passed on they would have carried the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to the expedition. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation things to his warnings he was a pretty effective agent it has to be said. and then there is also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy, and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he makes snakes seem like a model of rectitude and chameleons, ch
who combined a career as commander in chief of the united states army and that's how congress designated him commander in chief with his second existence as agent 13 in the spanish secret service. 11 years he commanded the nation's forces. he garrisoned its forts and patrolled the forests. and at the same time he fed the military secrets to the largest power in the hemisphere and if spain had acted a little more vigorously on the warnings that agent 13 passed on they would have captured the lewis and clark expedition and put a halt to their westward exploration. and they did heed his advice about fortifying the border with texas and so they kept the united states out of texas for about a generation thanks to his warning. so he was a pretty effective agent. it has to be said. and then there's also his reputation as the man who founded the spanish conspiracy and the spanish conspiracy was designed to split away kentucky and tennessee from the rest of the country. so a guy like that, you know, he really makes sort of snakes seem like a model of good and chameleons look good compa
's making the choice for you. the u.s. -- the united states, america, is the world's largest economy. it's three times larger than our closest competitor, japan. and it's larger than the economies of japan, china, germany, and great britain combined. and we got there through innovation. we got there through choice. we got there through competition. we got there through individual initiative and responsibility. not government control and management. as we have seen time after time, when you substitute a government controlled and run program for individual choice, the cost goes up, the quality goes down. and when it comes to health care, there's nothing more important than quality and choice. given the choice, i'll always place my faith in the individual not the government and this time is no different. no different with the credit card legislation, no different with the health care legislation. mr. chairman, let me conclude by saying many of my colleagues in this body, both republicans and democrats, are going to come in and they are going to vote for this legislation today. they are goin
voice. we are under a vote right now. this is what we used. the biggest voice in the united states is the voice of the american people. i was reading in the journals . . that is the wife of our second president. our second president, john adams. abigail adams wrote in her journals and diaries, and very personal insight. she said, after all we have done. after all that has happened. i wonder if generations on born will ever know what was done for them. at the sacrifice, the toyo, -- toil, treasure, heartache, what was spent to secure liberty and freedom. the fathers knew the cost. you literally stand with us on how aground. this is hallowed ground of freedom. that freedom was purchased at an incalculable price that others of us cannot truly comprehend. for 233 years, every generation that has come before has faithfully handed the baton of freedom to the next generation. so now, we are that privileged generation. privileged to be here today. privileged as you stand here in place for other freedom loving americans all over the country today. they would give anything to be where you ar
that we have had the highest deficit in the history of the united states, $1. trillion, -- the $1.4 trillion, the pelosi plan comes in weighing at $1 trillion. when we just got unemployment figures back, think about this, the president with an 8.5% unemployment rate pushes upon the congress a $787 billion stimulus bill and now unemployment has gone from 8.5% to 10.2% and in so many other pockets of america it's 14%, 15% and 16%. where are the jobs? why have we taken the focus off the main thing, the economy? why are we going down the track of government takeover of health care? and massive mandates on individuals, doctors and small businesses? just like china. mr. speaker, 1,900 pages, it's ridiculous. the republican alternative, which is not even half, not even 25%, but i'd say maybe 15% in size, weighing in at say maybe a mere $1 -- 150 pages, bring more competition for individuals, association health care plan to let small businesses pool together, expansion of health savings accounts, medical malpractice reform to reduce frivolous lawsuits. this is the republican alternative a
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
is it when a united states citizen is declared disabled they have to wait time before they can get medicaid or medicare? host: 8 collar like that, better worse off? -- a caller like that. . guest: there are obviously community health clinics and other medical facilities that provide medical care cheaply or, in the cases of need, for free. i'm not minimizing the collar's husband's typical. i am sure -- caller's husband's difficulty. but there is health care available in the country for people who cannot afford to pay. ad. caller: good morning, michigan. host: michigan. i'm sorry. caller: i just wanted to say the last time i checked, unemployment was 19.5%, and my husband, who just had his 29th anniversary at the company he worked at has been laid off and is losing his mind. i would be crying if i thought it would do any good, but it will not. he is doing everything he can to find a job. as soon as he sees something in the newspaper, he goes there. he is so talented, he can fix anything, but he is 65 years old, too, and that is a problem. a few weeks ago, senator lugar? he was on "newsmakers"
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. . -- the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentlelady from arizona rise? >> i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. kirkpatrick: mr. speaker, on november 5, a university held their symposium dedicated to issues on homeland security on its prescott, arizona, campus. unfortunately, the house held votes that day and i could not attend, but i heard it was a fantastic event. this year's theme was challenges for homeland security in the 21st century, and panelists from the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and t.s.a., the arizona department of public safety, and from the worlds of academia, among other places. topics covered a wide range of issues such as sipersecurity, public-private partnerships -- cybersecurity, public-private partnerships and coordination between local and federal law enforcement. i congratulate the faculty at the camp
interest of the united states it is urgently needed. the president knows achieving this goal will be difficult. he has said that he will not one of her -- waver in his pursuit in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his it ministration to the resumption of negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes thesuccess. the steps we have suggested to all parties to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends in themselves. they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. they can make a valuable contribution for achieving our goals of successful negotiations that result in a two-stage solution. that is why we urge the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action. it is why we have urged the arab state to take steps toward normalization. at the is what we have urged israel to stop activity. while they fall short, we feel the steps announced by the prime minister are significant and could have substantial impact on the ground. for the first time ever, an israeli government
between the united states and iran over iran's nuclear program. greg palkot has details. is he live in our london bureau tonight. what are the iranians saying about this. >> a top iranian prosecutor, according oour fox news journalist in tehran is saying that investigation is continuing. a conclusion could come soon and that could mean we are told, formal charges of he is subpoena nage, a trial even reportedly the death penalty for these three americans. we are also monitoring late today ahmadinejad at a press conference and he said and i quote "i'm hopeful that the situation will come out happily happily." then he okay nently claimed that u.s.-backed agencies were trying to kip iranian officials. linkage possible, shep. shepard: what's the reaction from the u.s. government and from their families for that matter? >> it's after noon. the white house and state department condemning the actions of iran. we heard from secretary of state clinton in berlin. she said, and i quote "we believe very strongly there is no evidence for any charge whatsoever." as for the families and the friends, they
five men that planned the attacks of 9/11 will face justice in the united states. just blocks from where the world trade center used to stand. some college victory for the rule of law. others call it a slap in the face. eric holder show that he was not about to apologize for the decision when some of the senators went after him. here is an example. >> you talked about the best chances to prosecute, one of the factors has to be that he has at least at some point asked to plead guilty. you must have taken that into account. >> that was then. i do not know what he wants to do now, and i will not base the determination on what a murderer wants to do. he will not select the prosecution venue, i will select it, and i have. shepard: the murderer said that he wanted to die here. that was the beginning of the exchange. the attorney general extended his position, saying that the world will see collied shake muhammed for the tower that he is. -- holly shake muhammed -- collied shake muhammed for the murderer that he is. >> the administration said that they were not making this a law enforceme
as a citizen of the united states is just appalling. i think eric holder should have left them in guantanamo bay and be tried there. i lived in new york in 2000 and 2001. it was just terrible. for them to be tried in a federal court, it just speaks to this country to give people that do not ware uniforms, do not apply to the geneva convention to come to our country and then be given rights like a citizen. host: david, in this newspaper article, attorney general holder elected to proceed with the first u.s. criminal prosecution alleged to have been directly involved in the plot eight years ago that targeted the world trade center and pent he gone because of his full confidence in the successful outcome. tell us why you are not as convinced of the outcome? caller: i'm not confident because i believe that in our country, people are innocent until proven guilty. when you use water boarding and all these things they are trying to use against ournqq governmen why should a terrorist be given rights in our country. host: let's go to the democratic line. caller: i think they should be tried here. t
on tropical storm ida. 50-mile per hour winds and heavy rain across much of the southeastern united states which has led to flooding in some areas particularly across portions of alabama. that is where the heaviest rain is right now. center of the storm has not yet made landfall but much of the rain and wind on the northern portion of that storm certainly has made landfall. right now, we are dealing with mild temperatures. 53degrees in the district. relative humidity, 89%. the winds are calm. parametric pressure on the rise, 0.27. here ia look at the satellite- radar. hook how cloudy it is across our region. much different from yesterday, the day before where we saw a good amount of sunshine. today, it will be mostly clouds. can't rule out a ray of sun here or there but a lot of clouds around for today and those clouds could eventually produce some moisture for us. here is your forecast for today though. we'll see a mild day. not as warm as it was yesterday. highs in the low to mid-60s. cloudy skies. maybe a sprinkle here or there butt best hance of rain rase lili tonight into tomorrow. mo
.s. secretary of state, secretary of war, and finally, to term president of the united states, the fifth president. as governor of virginia he became the second most powerful figure in america. virginia then was america's largest, wealthiest and heavily populated state with 20% of the american population. it stretched all the way to the mississippi river and all the way north to the great lakes. it was enormous and the prestige and its importance of the governor was akin to the governors of california, illinois, new york and texas put together. and monroe was not only governor of america's most important state, he was a national hero in the revolutionary war. in other words he was a giant in his day and i don't understand why historians ignore him which is why i wrote this book to restore him to his rightful place in american history as the most important president in the early days of the nation. now some historians elevate john adams to historical prominence and most historians deify thomas jefferson and james madison and these were three great founding fathers and great political phil
of israelis and palestinians to live in peace and security. it is also in the interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows that achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not weaver and his persistent pursuit of comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. to be clear, the steps we have suggested to all parties -- israel, the palestinians, and the arab states -- to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends to themselves, and they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. but they can make a valuable contribution toward achieving our goal of successful negotiations that result in a two-state solution. that's why we've urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action on incitement. it's why we have urged the arab states to take steps toward normalization of relations w
by the position on the economy. i want to show you the map. this is the united states if you notice the elevation, the higher the state, the higher the unemployment rate. this is what happened last month, if the state is red, the rate went up last month. if the state is green, it came down a little bit in the last month. michigan has the highest in the country, but it came down a bit last month. nevada is high and it came down last month. look at all of the red. 29 states the rate went up last month. we asked in the cnn polling what do you think of economic conditions today? 82% say the economy is in bad shape and then you asked the follow-up question, politically who is to blame for this? right now 38% blame the republicans, 27% the democrats. in may it was 53% republicans and 21% democrats. so james carville if you're looking at that tep months or so in the obama administration. you see a trend in the polling. you're in charge now so you will get more in the blame. >> who are the 18% that didn't think it was bad. i'm curious about these people. >> you are. >> as you would expect that you get fu
in the united states, and i am the only comedian ever to have attacked the apollo audience. tavis: i want to hear this story. >> there was a young white wrapper on -- white rapper on, and the audience was heating up. i said you guys are so easy. you are impressed by it. i am offended by it. i said, what you do when you go to the zoo and you go to the monkey cage? he did not go to the monkey cage and say hello, my monkey, my name is paul. you got to the cage and make noises. you go to the monkey's level. that is how i look at that. if it offends me. tavis: and the apollo did what? >> they got quiet. it was the truth. i do not have to defend the truth. the truth defends itself. tavis: if you in your own mind are being truthful and you are killing it in your own mind and the audience is a quiet, is that success? the point is to make us laugh. >> the point is to make us laugh, but audiences like a monster. i remember when i used to try to please the audience and kiss their but, do any thing to make them happy, anything to get a laugh, i learned in beverly hills. i just said, you know what, i
governance. in other words, what is the role of the united states as a very significant shareholder in general motors. we're not looking at it from the auto industry but across the institution where we have a significant interest and what role the united states is playing in the management of those companies. the united states is the government the obama administration stated repeatedly that it wants to have the board run the company the way they deem appropriate and that's obviously a policy balance against the concerns raised by you which is taxpayer money being used to fund opal and make sure europeans maintain their jobs. we're going to do an audit product that really takes a look at what the obama administration has said its role is going to be and compare to what's actually happened and see how those match up and come up with some ideas and recommendations going forward. so we're going to take a look from an audit perspective but it's important to remember that when this money was invested, whether it was with general motors or citi or in the capital purchase program, differen
. >>> tropicastorm ida is getting weaker as it approaches the united states but it's still battering parts of the gulf coast with heavy rains. this is video from the southwest coast of alabama tonight. bob ryan is here with more on ida's track and her impact. sfwhob. >> doreen, it will be a major rain producer. that's the impact. the winds have now decreased. you can see on the regional radar, and i will zoom into that, it is pretty much assure heading into mobile bay, mobile, alabama, but on the east side still very heavy rain. look at pensacola, seven inches of rain today and after a very, very wet season, all wait from georgia on into louisiana, the threat from ida not so much the win winds. the tides will be well above average but flooding rains over the next couple of days. tell you more about any impact here. back to you. >> thanks, bob. >>> coming up and to the -- president obama is moving closer to a decision on troop levels in afghanistan. >>> mayor fenty responds to video that shows him using police escorts to bike on prohibited streets. >>> employees at the zoo tell news 4 why a
in the united states for decades. between 1995 and 2002 alone, the number of those jobs declined by 11%. >> but some companies are finding ways to save manufacturing jobs and keep them here in this country even in these tough economic times. >> for someone who runs a guitar string manufacturing business, jim is also a bit of a tinkerer. over the past two years, he's cut inventory, extreme lined factory floor operations, updated technology, and saved jobs at his long island-based company. >> we made a commitment in the '70s that we were going to make our products in america. and we're still committed to that. we have never sold one string that we didn't make here in new york. >> daddario is one employer who adopted the production strategy that's known as lean. more than half of u.s. manufacturers surveyed have implemented lean or expect to do so. d'ad d'addario. we have not going to lay people off because lean has been effective. what we're trying to do is we take those people and we train them to do something else. >> like work in the guitar strap division. part of the company that the
in the united states. a lot of those democrats, however, in congress right now are very moderate. a lot of them are not for comprehensive immigration reform. none want to take a vote on immigration right now. it is the new third rail of american politics. but obama made promises in that area and so did a lot of more liberal democrats. the hispanic caucus is growing in influence. i think that's kind of the next policy piece to explode in washington. host: our guests have been patricia murphy. the wsi attached to our website. also joining us, jillian bandies. again, their website attached to the c-span website as well. thank you for joining us. we're going to do a short bit of phones and then we're going to talk about bus service in the united states. we'll be right back. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> washington journal continues. >> host: if you want to weigh in on the short period of open phones, the numbers are on the bottom of your screen. the financial times has a story about army recruitment, military recr
. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the -- the yeas are 233. the speaker pro tempore: the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker: the house -- the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk will read. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, madam. i have the honor to transmate here with a copy of a letter received from kathy mitchell, head of the elections commission of the california elections offer, and according to the returns of the special election on november 3, 2009, john garamendi was elected to the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? one moment, please. clerk will resume. the clerk will resume. the clerk: indicating t
. those are things that are are unpopular. and he's a president of the united states being told by the military, mr. president, we can't defend those outposts and we need more people to do a countersurge insurgency. and i guess it these are correct and they puts 43,000 troops in, imagine the progressiveness, with the troops, if you don't advance health care. i think he'll find 10,000 and train the army because he's politically unsustainable with his base, if he puts in 43,000 troops and prosecutes afghanistan during a water with afghanistan as president, i think he'll have a democrat primary and that we'll have a substantial split mountain democrat party, if that's what he does. and i would argue this -- for our party, and the tensions between our kind of economic votes and our religious conservatives, the fact that the energy in republican party is about spending and deficit, if we're so inept we can't take these people and make them part of a new coalition, they we oughting to nothinged. the -- this are 24% of the people in this country who say they would likely vote for a thi
interesting patterns >>> the first hurricane to threaten the united states this year, atlantic hurricane season, anyway, is due to hit the gulf coast tomorrow morning. forecasters say hurricane ida could cause flooding, rough surf and tornadoes from eastern mississippi to the florida panhandle. right now it's a category 1 with 90-mile-an-hour winds. no mandatory evacuations have been ordered yet. we'll watch this this morning. >>> two u.s. pilots were killed when their helicopter went down in northern iraq. the military says the army chopper had a hard landing yesterday and the incident is under investigation. separately, a u.s. marine died from noncombat injuries west of baghdad. >>> now it falls on the united states senate to take the baton and bring this effort to the finish line on behalf of the american people. and i'm absolutely confident that they will. >> that was president obama yesterday, congratulating the house after it narrowoly passed aed 1.2 billion health care reform bill. it calls for a public option, which may not get enough support to survive in the senate version. the
. this is about three hours. >> natural and areas in the united states and the as many of you know, the you know the standing contention of our program at brookings is that we are in metropolitan nation, that the national economy is essentially the makeup of a network of metropolitan economies. and some national economic recovery from the current downturn very much depends on recovery of metropolitan economies. today we will be discussing how a large extent the recovery of metro's depends to a meaningful degree on cities or other local governments being fiscally healthy. it's not yet been covered too much in the mainstream public discourse but given the worst recession we've seen in decades potentially overwhelming local government fiscal crisis is now looming on the horizon and our partners at the national cities have conducted a very timely survey showing a nearly nine in ten city finance officers are reporting difficulties in meeting fiscal needs and 2009 and expect the same in 2010. the pain is widespread from foreclosure cities in the metro like phoenix and vegas to areas like cleveland and
as the manufacturing sector. but manufacturing jobs have actually been vanishing in the united states for decades. between 1995 and 2002 alone the number of those jobs declined by 11%. >> but some companies are finding ways to save manufacturing jobs and keep them here in this country even in these tough economic times. >> reporter: for someone who runs a guitar string manufacturing business, jim is also a bit of a tinkerer. over the past two years, he's cut inventories, streamlined factory floor operations, updated technology, and saved jobs at his long island-based company. >> we made a commitment in the '70s we were going to make our products in america, and we're still committed to that. we've never sold one string that we didn't make here in new york. >> reporter: he's one of a growing number of u.s. manufacturers that have adopted the toyota waste reduction strategy popularly known as l.e.a.n. that popular relies on automation. more than half surveyed have implemented l.e.a.n. or plan to do so. he says the replaced workers can be cross trained to do other jobs. >> we do not want to lay peop
and the democratic and republican party. we need to start operating like the united states instead of everybody trying to get what their states need. i am from oregon. we get a free ride on this. i do not want anything off of my countrymen's back. i do not need it. host: think you for your participation. up next, we will share from the agricultural secretary, tom vilsack about food security in the united states. we will be right back. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] >> this weekend the u.s. financial crisis. nomi prins will be on. sunday afternoon, three new books about sarah palin, including a book signing. scott conroy on sarah from alaska. >> american icon, three nights of c-span original documentaries on the iconic homes of the three branches of american government. beginning thursday night at 8:00 eastern, the supreme court, home to america's highest court, reveals the building in exquisite detail. saturday at 8:00 eastern, the capital. famerican icon, three memorable nights. this day, friday, and saturday at
in the united states, and there is no need to burden women with unnecessary testing. others say it is a bad thing because it will lead in essence to health care rationing. >> and gynecologists are doing too many basic tests, that is the problem that should be addressed, not getting rid of the screening tests. do not throw the baby out with the bathwater. >> it sounds like dr. siegel is saying that more women will die as a result of these new guidelines. does that worry you? for >> that is not the case at all. as he said himself, 80% of cervical cancers are in developing countries, not here in united states. that is because it is women who do not get a test in five years or have never had one -- those are the populations that we worry about. rick: james, thanks very much. this leads us to our question of the day at our website, foxnews.com/shep. he's not here today, but he is on line of toys. people today -- you can go on to our website and have your say. we will look at the results a little bit later. we will also hear a little bit later from our fox news medical 18. that is coming up a lit
already have more than 3,000 public housing agencies in the united states. andrew: 30,000? >> 3,000, and now we have two giant new ones and the track record of government. think of fema and the trailers after the hurricane. they put people in trailers. you could buy a trail fore$30,000. andrew: fema trailers are gone. >> no, people are still live in the trailers. under this new deal on renting the housing, they say it will be months -- up to a year but there will be month to month extensions, so when will they ever get these people out? the point about the trailers, $30,000. >> $70,000 fema spent and in one case, more than $200,000. andrew: so the government spends twice what they are worth and promises they will be there for a few months and they're still there. i can remember public housing in newark, and the next day it blew up. >> they didn't know anything about writing mortgages. that's why fannie and freddie went bankrupt r it's a great thing for people in over their heads to become rent remembers instead of home other thans but i would like them renting from private landl
. it will be necessary to have such a fund. and that fund should not be the united states treasury. we're going to be risking more debt to enact this -- to enact this proposal. so the amendment would prohibit the united states treasury from being used as a means for capital reserve funds. the amendment also clarifies that the public plan would need to seek investments or use premiums to create a capital reserve fund similar to that which is required of other health plans. allowing the united states treasury to be the ultimate backstop will encourage -- would encourage the plan to act recklessly. we've already seen what happens when this is applied. while this bill prohibits bailouts of the public plan using the treasury has a promise of government backing is indirectly, we're allowing such. the public plan can still use the faith and credit of the united states to stabilize their risk. if it's good enough for business, it's good enough for insurers. even casinos, it should be good enough for the public plan. shouldn't they play by the same rules as everyone else. it is committed to a public pla
that it does, sir. >> the chief of staff for the united states army says so. >> our orders are to hold his breath. -- is to hold this bridge. if we let the germans take it, we will lose our football. >> if you're up it wants to stay that is one thing. >> i cannot leave until reinforcements come. >> you have three minutes to gather your gear. >> what about them? there's barely enough -- >> two of our guys already died trying to find you. >> server. >> that's right. >> what were their names? >> wade and copazzo. >> it doesn't make any sense. >> one man screamed at me. i gave him my canteen and in one drink, he drained dry. as the prisoners chimeras, they were pulled back by the others because they did not trust us. this man that i gave my canteen to, several minutes later, cracked his stomach and doubled up and began to retch and all that came out were trickles of water. he had nothing in him to come out. at that point, i heard several of them say in whatever language they were speaking but i recognize the word poison. i am sure they thought i had poisoned of them. i kept saying -- i don't t
to amend title 38, united states code and the service -- service members civil relief act to make certain improvements in the law regarding benefits administered by the secretary of veterans affairs and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the s hat foreigners see this a bit differently. they think we are -- so that foreigners see this a bit differently. they think we are not doing nearly enough. host: next call, joe, good morning. caller: thank you for c-span. i would like to hear more on the mountaintop removal situation in west virginia. our climate is definitely changing because of mountaintop removal. we have had 2 million acres in the appalachians destroyed, one of the most reverse ecosystems in the world: flattened. over 2,000 miles of streams have beenuried. 62% of our streams are in west virginia -- 62% of our streams in west virginia are known to be polluted with heavy metals. the fish are contaminated. you cannot eat fish out of the streams. if you live in the proximity, a report that was suppressed by the bush
? >> i think there is a list, a long list, of countries over a period of time that the united states and the president will host as visitors and guest here, but i think what came about with this one, this is 810-year relationship -- 810-year relationship. over 10 years, there has really been an important partnership in reaching out on the part of president clinton, on the part of president bush, to really solidified this important strategic relationship. there is so much -- this is the largest democracy in the world, india is. we are the second-largest democracy. there is an important relationship that needs to be nurtured and continue. the national security advisers of the president -- have said that he should which it will recommend others that he should host. and ultimately, that will be his decision. >> we heard earlier that this is the first lady's show. when does the first lady's office began preparing for a state dinner? >> this dinner, likely, or this visit started right at the time that secretary clinton hand- deliver the invitation from president obama to prime minister sin
computer glitch caused the delay of thousands of flights across the united states on thursday. but as lisa stark reports, this is not the first time that such an incident has happened. and there are concerns about how something like this could impact passenger safety. >> reporter: as planes began backing up around the country, on the ground and in the air, the faa scrambled to unravel the glitch in the air traffic control system. >> i just walked in the airport. looked at the board and said your flight's canceled. >> i'm tired and i'm frustrated. >> reporter: no one was going anywhere fast. extensive delays stretched from new york to atlanta to houston. by 1 calculation, the glitch may have caused as many as 2,000 flight delays. the problem began shortly after 5:00 a.m. eastern, when a single circuit board failed in a air traffic control center in salt lake city. it meant controllers around the nation were no longer receiving information about flights electronically. instead, they had to resort to phone calls and manually imputing flight information into their computers. >> you have to typ
the microscope. >> isn't it true that on 9/11, the united states pentagon, the center of our defense establishment, was directly attacked by the people who declared war upon us? >> there is no question that is true. one of the factors -- one of the factors that i considered in making this determination. the number of people who were killed on 9/11 were largely civilians. >> on the suspect in the uss cole attack which killed 17 sailors in october 2000, holder appeared to follow the same logic. >> an attack on an american warship it seems to me is uniquely situated for a military commission. >> the top senate republican pounced. "is the administration now telling terrorists if they target defenseless u.s. civilians on their own soil, they will get the rights an privileges of american citizens? " senator mitch mcconnell asked? others said the administration is creating a two-tiered system. >> if you are a sailor and attacked in the gulf defending your country, you go to a military commission, but if they happen to execute an attack in the united states, though none of those five men eve
in the united states efficiently, cost effectively and so forth. some manufacturing should be done in china. too much manufacturing is being done in china that could be done more effectively in the united states. >> jim agrees and hopes other manufacturers will follow his lead. >> i think people are afraid to make the commitment to lean, to automation, to reinvesting in the factories, because they have this stigma in their mind. they have this belief that you can't make it effectively and profitably in america. it is not true. i think people give up on manufacturing in america prematurely and it can be done. >> ali velshi, cnn, new york. >>> being confined to wheelchairs is not stopping some people who have found a way to get their competitive juices flowing. we are going to introduce you to a game that made it's mark overseas but it is now catching on in the u.s. >>> tiger woods is not talking about his one-car accident. hear what investigators heard when they went to his house to get answers. >> get out of my face. what are you doing? >> cindy sheehan had an explosive exchange with a man who s
. he was a fifth generation mary landrieu who served as a commanding general of the united states army for many years and was the first governor of louisiana territory in 1805. he became a secret agent of the spanish government in 1787, and was called agent number 13. he was a double agent over 30 years. general wilkinson died in mexico city in 1825 working for the mexican government. in the one short year that wilkinson was governor of louisiana territory in 1805, he created a lot of chaos over corrupt land deals. he was a co-conspirator with aaron burr in the 1806 attempt to invade mexico. but he betrayed burr and saved himself. at birth was indicted for treason and wilkinson narrowly escaped indictment. merriweather lewis was present at birth trial, for treason, after he returned from the expedition. lewis served as jefferson's eyes and ears at the trial and report back to him. windlass accepted the position of governor of louisiana territory, his first responsibility was to root out suspected burr writes from position of power and influence. ehrenberg brother-in-law, joseph brown,
of the discussion has been around the fence that the united states wants to pursue a counterterrorism strategy where they target specific regions of afghanistan. there's an understanding that if you seven of troops to blame did the entire country that it would take something like half a million troops. nobody is talking about that. there are specific regions, especially in the southern part of afghanistan and, that they're talking about increasing the troops as a way of giving them more control over those regions and an ability to push back against the extremists, the taliban, and al-qaeda. host: what will he be asking of nato? guest: there have been many discussions over the past months to try to increase the number of troop commitments from nato countries as a way of allowing the united states to have slightly less of a commitment. in the speech, i think you will see a strong call from the president for the nato allies and the other allies around world to step up. host: thank you very much for being with us this morning, michael shear. there are a number of "washington post"front page stories. thi
and everybody in the united states, but each patient is different. when a patient comes in, she is not, to me, t general population. she is that patient. >> reporter: dr. gava says the guidelines are only a recommendation, a patient with a higher risk for developing cervical cancer would be screened earlier in age or more frequently. tamika says she was'nt a high-risk case and if she had missed her screening, she could have gotten her diagnosis too late. >> we possibly wouldn't be here. i wouldn't be here to tell my story. >> reporter: she is lucky. experts will tell that you tamika fielders' case is extremely rare, maybe 1 in a million cases of cervical cancer happen to young women. what is more likely to happen she gets a positive pap smear and goes through unnecessary treatment. one thing doctors tell us, cervical cancer is a slow-growing disease. if a patient does miss one year of screening, doctors say it can still be caught at an early stage in their next test. >> this has been such a busy and confusing week. we've got the mammography recommendations. these are two completely different stu
assaulting a child. >>> somali pirates have hijacked a tanker on its way to the united states. a european union spokesperson says the ship was taken about 800 miles from somalia yesterday. it has 28 crew members, none of them from the united states. somali pirates have taken dozens of ships, but this may be only the second attack of an oil tanker. >>> tiger wood sincere talking about a car accident over the weekend, but he's not talking to police about it. rafer weigel has more about that. >> tiger and his wife erks elin, turned away from cops. under florida law, he technically does not have to talk to police. his attorney says, quote, it's a private matter. the accident happened early friday when woods ran his suv over a fire hydrant and crashed into a tree. he did release this statement on his website yesterday which reads, in part, although i understand there is curiosity, the many false, unfounded and malicious rumors that are currently circulating about my family and me are irresponsible. the only person responsible for the accident is me. that's a curious statement, robin. a tabloid
it falls on the united states senate to at that time baton and bring the this efrlt to the againish line on behalf of the american people. >> reporter: but the senate may not run with it anytime soon. senator reid has yet to school the floor debate and he's hinted a final bill may not happen until early next year. and if passed, this would be the biggest expansion of health care coverage since medicare. michelle, back to you. >> tara mergener in washington. tara, thanks. >>> and just ahead on the "morning news," commuters in philadelphia get back on track this morning. plus, mixed messages. parents get lost in the facts over the h1n1 flu. first, katie couric has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> why are big corporate donors giving to this congressman's scholarship foundation that hasn't given out a single scholarship in six years? we'll "follow the money" this week only on the "cbs evening news." . yes, they are. but i don't have time to fly all around town searching for the best price. with the sears research center, we can guarantee you get the lowest price. great, i'll ta
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